Area officials monitor water levels, precipitation

March 17, 2008

Predicted rainfall this week in and around Tuscarawas County could produce additional flooded roadways and possibly isolate residents in the county's northern region over the next several days, particularly around Zoarville and the Michael Lane area near Zoar.

Officials from throughout the county met Monday (March 17) with Tuscarawas County Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency (HS/EMA) staff to discuss potential flooding and other issues that could occur if the region receives additional rainfall this week. Weather forecasts predict that up to 1.5 inches of rain could fall on the area on Tuesday (March 18), and up to 1 inch of rain could fall on Wednesday (March 19).

Several portions of northern Tuscarawas County already are affected by flooded roads from reservoir water stored behind Dover, Bolivar and Atwood dams. Officials from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), which operate the dams, said that any rainfall this week could produce flooding issues into next week in those areas.

Tuscarawas County HS/EMA officials said they will work closely with USACE staff and provide notification to communities and residents who may be isolated by flooding.

Trustees in Fairfield, Lawrence and Sandy townships said they were monitoring roads for safety and access in the event of flooding. Lawrence Township officials said they are working to open an emergency connection between North Orchard Rd. (Tuscarawas County Rd. 103) and Glen Park Dr. (Township Rd. 617) over Bolivar Dam to Gracemont Rd., if needed. USACE officials also said that Rt. 800 north of Mineral City is expected to remain open with the current forecast.

USACE officials said they expect to maintain the current releases of water from Dover Dam.

Officials said updated information on water levels behind the area dams are available online by visiting the USACE website at www.lrh-wc.usace.army.mil/wc/musns.htm.

CONTACT:
Darrin Lautenschleger
Public Information Administrator
Toll-free: (877) 363-8500

 

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